OUR BLOG

The Copy Corner: What is a Dangling Modifier?

Chances are you’ve heard of a dangling or misplaced modifier, likely during high school English class. But if you’re like a lot of people, you’ve completely forgotten about them. And that’s okay. Here’s a brief overview: Essentially, a dangling modifier is a modifier that has an unclear or missing subject. And a misplaced modifier is one whose subject is unclear because of where the modifier is placed in relation to its intended subject. Now let’s get into the details… What is a modifier? A modifier simply gives the reader more information about its subject. Without a care in the world, John walked down the street. “Without a care in the world,” is describing John’s state of mind. Susan ate a plate of hot spaghetti. “Hot” is describing the temperature of the spaghetti. Problems arise when it is unclear what subject a modifier is modifying. Dangling Modifiers A dangling modifier has no apparent subject to modify. For example: Incorrect: Upon waking at 7 a.m., my head began to hurt. This example can be confusing because it sounds as if my head woke at 7 a.m. You can correct it by changing the sentence to read: Correct: My head began hurting when Read more…

What is The Difference Between Web Development and SEO?

It’s important to recognize the difference between hiring a web developer or designer and hiring an SEO for help with your website. In the video below we discuss and review the differences between web development and an SEO. A few tips when redesigning your website: Run your website through a technical SEO analysis Optimize images for search (this helps with site speed) Optimize for mobile Look for duplicate content Look for bad links Make sure name, address, phone are correct on all pages Do you need help with an SEO audit or content strategy? Contact us here for help.        

Eight Easy Peasy Blogging Strategies

Eight easy to start blogging strategies Blogging is still essential to SEO and you should be blogging as often as you can. However, blogging requires a plan of attack. Below are eight reasons why you should be blogging followed by eight easy peasy blogging strategies. 1.use the news You should sign up for local news alerts and then cite and give your opinion on a news piece that would interest your readers. Make sure you are using a credible news source and link back to the original article. This is a great strategy as it keeps your clients up-to-date and shows that you are too. You might not be able to get a post up that day, but do it as quickly as possible and make sure you explain how it might affect your readers. Benefits Good for SEO Linking to reputable source Affordable and quick 2. Curate your content Find the most popular content (blog, article, image, infographic, etc.) in your niche using a REDDIT or BuzzSumo and aggregate it together to create a new piece of content. Introduce your topic and use each article as a subheadline. Make sure you use an image for each and always give credit to the original article. Read more…

The Copy Corner: Grammar Controversies Recap

Every day, I come across grammar rules that draw a line in the sand between grammar traditionalists and modern grammarians. Today, we’ll review the usual suspects. When do you use an apostrophe? I won’t spend too much time on the basics, but I feel it’s important to provide a simple definition of an apostrophe. Apostrophes are used to indicate a common noun’s plural possession. The rule of thumb is, if the common noun doesn’t end in the letter –s, it’s singular and therefore, you would add an apostrophe after the word and before the letter –s to make it a possessive plural. If the common noun ends in the letter –s, then, you would add an apostrophe after the –s. Here’s what I mean… The truck’s tires The girls’ dresses If the noun is already plural, such as “girls,” just add an apostrophe; an ­–s is not needed. However, if it is a proper noun ending in –s, add another –s after the apostrophe. Jess’s hair looks great. Do not add an –s after the apostrophe if the next word begins with the letter –s. Jess’ skin looks great. The most common misuse I see is the greengrocer’s apostrophe, which Read more…

Stop! Don’t Create Another Blog Post

Don’t Start Another Blog Post Until You Read this. Just stop! If you are creating content only because someone told you to blog and post something on your website, then stop! Content should have a purpose and should have the same accountability as your intake department, your receptionist, or your website. You wouldn’t just slap a web page together and call it your own, would you? If you would, then stop reading. This post isn’t for you. This post is for the law firm or business that is passionate about their digital marketing strategy, or the law firm or business that is about to start a digital marketing strategy and doesn’t know where, how, or why to begin. You may be confused or overwhelmed with SEO, content, social media, inbound marketing, and more.   I want to help you get started. I want to give you the confidence and knowledge it takes to develop a strategy with basic SEO techniques, that will get you results. Yes, content alone can work for your legal website of you are free of technical SEO issues. However, you have to understand that anything organic takes time; it takes commitment just like any diet or Read more…

The Copy Corner: Guide to Using Punctuation

One thing I’ve noticed quite often is that there is quite a bit of confusion about when and how to use certain types of punctuation. The following clears up how and when to use commas, periods, semicolons, and colons, along with a few others. Commas To figure out if you need to use a comma, period, or semicolon, first consider the purpose of the punctuation. For example: When I drove to the store yesterday_ my car broke down. The purpose of the punctuation in this sentence is to link the first part of the sentence (dependent clause) with the second part (independent clause), so you would use a comma. When I drove to the store yesterday, my car broke down. You can’t use a period or semicolon because, “When I drove to the store yesterday,” is not a complete thought. Periods You use a period to finish a thought. For example: I drove to the store yesterday_ My car broke down_ You would use a period after both sentences because they are two distinct thoughts. I drove to the store yesterday. My car broke down. Semicolons You can also use a semicolon in the example above because the expressed are Read more…

Infographic: Happy Be Kind to Lawyers Day 2016!

  April 12, 2016 is Be Kind to Lawyers Day! If you know a lawyer, work with lawyers, or if you hired a lawyer to represent you, take a moment today to thank them. Moreover, if you’re a lawyer yourself, we hope you’ll take a moment today to reflect on the journey you took to get where you are and all of the rewards that the legal field can bring. Also, make sure you check out our infographic celebrating the work and dedication lawyers demonstrate every day. It reviews the path lawyers take to become lawyers in the first place, tells a few uplifting stories from the legal field, and shares some tips for celebrating Be Kind to Lawyers Day. Self-described non-lawyer Steve Hughes created Be Kind to Lawyers Day as a way to honor and celebrate lawyers. His thinking was that if we have holidays to celebrate things like ice cream and bubble wrap, why not take a day to recognize lawyers too? We agree. Lawyers work hard and help us through major moments in our lives. They deserve recognition from their friends, family, co-workers, and clients. Check out www.bekindtolawyers.com for more of Steve’s story. If you would like Read more…

The Copy Corner: Subject-Verb Agreement

Subject-verb agreement is relatively straightforward. If your subject is singular, use a singular verb. If your subject is plural, use a plural verb. For example, consider the verb “walk.” Whether “walk” is singular or plural depends on the subject. Singular: “John walks the dog.” Plural: “They walk the dog.” Seems simple enough, right? Well, things can get a little complicated when there is more than one subject. Subjects Separated by “Or” This is especially true in cases with two subjects separated by “or.” When you have two subjects separated by “or,” the verb should agree with the subject closest to it. For example: Incorrect: “If Tom or his friends was injured…” Correct: “If Tom or his friends were injured…” In this case, “his friends” is closest to the verb, so you would make the verb plural. Subjects Separated Commas Commas that separate two subjects can also make things more confusing. Incorrect: John, along with his wife, go to the gym every other day. Correct: John, along with his wife, goes to the gym every other day. The first example looks like it should be correct because the sentence is referring to John and his wife; however, the comma separates John Read more…

The Copy Corner: What is pronoun-antecedent agreement?

An antecedent is the word, phrase, or clause that the pronoun replaces in a sentence. For example: John ate his meal in silence because he was mad at his wife. ‘John’ is the antecedent; ‘his’ and ‘he’ replaces John. It seems simple enough, but it can be a real issue for a lot of people. Why is it an issue? In some cases, such as the example above, it is easy to pick the correct pronoun that will replace the antecedent. However, cases that involve phrases, indefinite singular pronouns, or demonstrative pronouns can be much more difficult. For example: Sara hopes that the gardener does not start the yard work at 8 a.m. again. That will allow her to sleep in. The phrase, “that the gardener does not start the yard work at 8 a.m. again” is the antecedent, while “that” (italicized in the second sentence) is the demonstrative pronoun that replaces it. Sentences with indefinite pronouns can also be tricky. For example: Incorrect: Each of the partygoers ate their dinner quickly. Correct: Each of the partygoers ate his or her dinner quickly. Because “each” is singular, you would use “his” or “her” to replace it later. Although this is Read more…