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Are You Creating Content Your Readers Want to Share? Ask Yourself These 3 Questions.

The purpose of shareable content in the legal field is to get links back to your website (which is great for SEO) and to generate traffic and brand awareness. While not always the case, shareable, or contagious, content can also generate leads, either directly or indirectly. For example, if you create a well-designed infographic detailing the criteria to qualify for Social Security disability, it might generate links and traffic as people share it. And consider the target audience of this content — people applying for or who may apply for Social Security disability. Thus, helpful content that helps them better understand the intricacies of Social Security disability demonstrates your law firm’s competency. This might ultimately help you generate leads. So, let’s look at what makes content shareable. A shareable post is interesting, unique, and usually something that helps your readers in some way. Here are some tips to create content your readers will want to share. Does Your Content Share Information Readers Want to Know? Your readers likely aren’t going share something that doesn’t interest them. You might want to interview clients or followers to determine what exactly they might be wondering about. You can also do keyword research to Read more…

Could Your Content Be Better? 4 Questions to Ask Yourself

We should always strive to make our content better than anything out there. So, I ask you: is your content good? Could you make it even better? Not sure? Ask yourself these questions: 1) Are You Offering Valuable Information? For example, if you’re using statistics, is it making your content stronger or is it just fluff? If the latter, choose statistics that support a point you’re making, further your discussion, or demonstrate the magnitude of something. For example, say you’re writing a page about liability for a left-turn car accident. Which of the following fictional statistics do you think are more helpful to the page? Per the Traffic Association of America, two million car accidents occur each year. They cause 700,000 injuries and 50,000 deaths. According to statistics from XYZ Traffic Association, drivers turning left are at-fault in 75 percent of left-turn accidents. Drivers heading straight were at-fault 15 percent of the time, and both drivers shared fault 10 percent of the time. While the first statistic discusses accidents, the second statistic is specific to left-turn accidents and goes a step further by sharing information about liability for left-turn accidents. Does your information stick to the topic and make it Read more…

Plagiarism: The Quickest Way to Kill Your Website

Plagiarism is immoral and illegal. Most people know that. But did you know it can kill your website? Google might show the wrong page in its search results or might rank your site lower. How Can Plagiarism Kill My Website? Some people might think they can take a section or two from another site to support a point they’re trying to make. After all, they had the same thought and were going to say the exact same thing, but this site just explains it better. They think can use it on their site and they won’t get caught…right? Wrong. While taking another person’s words or ideas without giving credit is illegal, it will also likely not work out very well for your website, even if you aren’t caught. You Might Out Yourself by Stealing the Other Site’s Rel=Canonical Tags When you steal content from another site, you also steal its rel=canonical tags (i.e., tags sites use to avoid duplicate content; they designate a specific URL the site wants Google to see), letting Google know that the other site, not yours, created the content. Google will likely rank the creator of the content higher than a site that stole it, according Read more…

What Is Self-Plagiarism and Is it a Problem for SEO?

Most people know what plagiarism is and that it is morally and legally wrong. However, most people wouldn’t consider self-plagiarism a problem. But before we get into why self-plagiarism can harm your website, let’s define what it is. What Is Self-Plagiarism? Self-plagiarism is exactly what it sounds like: taking content you’ve written and using it for another page that you’re writing. For example, if I took part of my 2016 post about plagiarism and pasted it into this blog, that would be self-plagiarism. You might be thinking that you can’t possibly plagiarize yourself. After all, plagiarism is “taking credit for someone else’s words…ideas, style of writing, and sentence structure,” as I wrote in my previous post on plagiarism. So how you can steal your own ideas? Rather, self-plagiarism of your content on your website is called internal duplicate content. That is, the same content appears on at least two pages within the same website. How Does Self-Plagiarism Hurt My Website? And How Can I Avoid It? When you write 20 pages on the same topic, it’s easy to end up with some internal duplicate content (i.e., using the same phrases and sentences). For example, say you operate a personal injury Read more…

Does Your Content Need a Facelift? How & Why to Update Your Website Copy

Content and how we interact with it is always changing. The content you produced for your website four years ago might not live up to current standards and reader expectations. Ensuring your content is updated will give your readers what they want and keep them coming back for more. So how do you keep your site and its content up-to-date? Update Statistics and Laws Nothing screams outdated like statistics from 10 years ago or an old version of a law that has since changed. If a new law passes or an old one receives an update, change that information on any pages that mention it. Pro-tips: Set up Google alerts for news related to the area of law your firm practices. This way you’ll never miss any updates. Sign up for emails from websites that issue statistical reports that you use in your content. You will receive an email with the following year’s statistics. Ensure Your Content Works on Any Medium If you haven’t updated a page since 2013, chances are that page isn’t optimized for viewing on modern phones or tablets. In addition to making reading your content a more enjoyable experience for readers, ensuring your content works on Read more…

Show Don’t Tell: How to Demonstrate Your Business’s Value to Your Readers

Your content needs to show, not merely tell, your readers how your product, service, or business helps them. It’s not enough to tell readers that your product is good or that you’re good at what you do and expect them to take your word for it. Your content should demonstrate how your product or service helps readers solve a problem or reach their goal. But written content by nature is going to tell the reader something. So we first need to define what we mean when we say that your content should show not tell. Show: To demonstrate the value of your product or service through supportive evidence and detailed, descriptive language. Tell: To make unsupported promises about your product or service. How Can I Create Content That Shows Readers Why They Should Use My Service? Give Details About How Your Product or Service Helps the Reader Reach Their Goals Instead of just telling the reader that your product or service helps them, show them how. For example, if you sell nightlights, demonstrate how your product is different. Do you sell a cordless nightlight with a patented system that keeps kids from getting to the battery pack? Mention that. But Read more…

Treat Your Web Pages Like a Thanksgiving Meal

Think about your web pages the same way you think about your Thanksgiving meal. Each page needs to be just as “well-balanced” as your plate on Thanksgiving. Make sure every web page on your website has a main dish and side dishes: A Main Dish Just like your Thanksgiving needs turkey (or ham for me), a web page needs a main dish too. Your main dish is the information your readers came for. It’s the main purpose of the web page. For example, if you pose a question in the page title and h1, your main dish is the answer to that question. If your title is, “What Is a Class Action Lawsuit?” don’t give your readers a sales page about class action lawyers. Your web page needs to answer that question by explaining what class action lawsuits are and how they work. Just as your guests might be disappointed without a main dish, so will your readers be disappointed by a web page whose content does not satisfy their expectations. Side Dishes Side dishes are things that pull your web page together. For example, proper formatting, supporting information, and internal links make your page more aesthetically appealing and appetizing Read more…

Infographic: Happy Love Your Lawyer Day 2017!

November 3, 2017 is Love Your Lawyer Day. Created by Nader Anise (founder of the American Lawyers Public Image Association) in 2001, Love Your Lawyer Day gives us all a chance to show our appreciation for everything lawyers do to help their clients and the community. And if you’re a lawyer, take this day to reflect on the good you do for your clients and the justice system. Have you considered becoming a lawyer? Attending law school and being a lawyer isn’t like how it appears in TV and movies. Our team created an infographic with a short quiz that you can take to see if you have what it takes to become a lawyer. Take it and let us know your career goals! Click the image for the full version of our infographic! If you would like to show your love for lawyers on your own site, use the embed code below to share our infographic! <a target=”_blank” href=”https://www.wedowebcontent.com/infographic-happy-love-your-lawyer-day/”><img src=”https://www.wedowebcontent.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/lawyer-day-infographic-small.png” alt=”Happy Love Your Lawyer Day 2017! – Infographic from WeDoWebContent.com”/></a> Happy Love Your Lawyer Day from the team at We Do Web Content! Check Out Our Previous Love Your Lawyer Day Infographics For Love Your Lawyer Day 2016, we Read more…

5 Ways to Avoid Scaring Away Your Readers

BOO! Did I scare you? Unless it’s Halloween, that’s not what you want to do to your readers. That’s a quick way to lose your readers. Here are a few ways to avoid scaring away your readers: Scare Up Some Good Content Take your time finding content your readers care about. Interview readers, do research, and look at keywords to figure out what your audience is looking for. Once you figure out what readers want, decide on the best way to present the content so it is clear and engaging. You might consider an infographic or at least format your page to make it as scannable as possible. Be Ready for Trolls “Troll! In the dungeon!” Or, more accurately, behind the screen. Trolls love to club content to death. Make sure it’s troll-proof. Make sure your facts are correct and that you’ve proofread your content enough times that you dream about it. And if trolls do get ahold of your content, know when not to respond; and if you think you should respond, do so with dignity. Be Wary of Mummified Content Old content can have your readers running away faster than kids from the dentist’s house on Halloween. A Read more…

9 Reasons You Need to Proofread

I’m a stickler for proofreading — as I should be. After all, writing and editing is what I do. But not all agree. I don’t need to proofread because readers will know what I mean if I make a mistake. I don’t need to proofread because nobody cares about grammar. I don’t need to proofread because minor mistakes make me more relatable. I don’t need to proofread because I’m a good writer. But such thinking is faulty. A grammatical mistake could change your writing’s meaning or confuse your readers. Still not convinced? Here are nine ways that poor grammar or spelling could be detrimental to your content. And thus nine reasons you need to proofread. 1) Typos Weaken Your Credibility Typos are unprofessional and make your content — and you — less credible. When I proofread, I like to read through content first for typos, then do all other editing, and then check once more for typos. But I always run my content through spellcheck! That’s a good start, but computers are not perfect. Run your content through spellcheck and then read it over yourself. If you can, have a friend or coworker read it over for you. They might Read more…